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My Perfect Utopia Essay

A utopian society is a society which has perfect political and social order. When talking about a utopian society, the word perfect is synonymous. A perfect society seems close, but is really very far away. The ideal society consists of knowledge, reverence, and equality. Knowledge is the information that people acquire and use to have a better awareness and understanding of things. Reverence is having a respectful attitude towards something or someone that is held in high regard. Equality is when all living things are equal, and no one or thing is any better than another. These are the grounds on which the utopian society can prevail.

The foundation of the ideal society rests on the human mind. Knowledge brings better understanding. Education and knowledge are very important to this society. Religion dies because people do not feel confused, inferior, or empty. Citizens of the utopia are content with knowing that they lack the knowledge of the overall scheme of things. Of course they seek out this knowledge, but they do not claim to profess this knowledge.

School is necessary to expand one’s knowledge. From the age of five to eighteen, children attend school. In this span of time, children are prepared for their place in utopia. School is where the children gain the tools that will allow them to maintain this utopia. The sort of job one gets depends on desire and availability. If the job desired is not available, a different job is taken until the desired job becomes available. It is recognized that everyone’s part is essential to a perfect society, so no one minds taking a different job than they desire. This is one example of how rationality plays a big part in utopia. Everyone can accept realities and the word “whine” is not a part of their vocabulary. Occupations such as doctors and lawyers are not held in high regard. Only jobs that merit praise receive it, such as teachers. This also pertains to everything else in utopia. Anything that is undeserving of praise is not valued.

Everyone gets what they are entitled to and greed no longer exists. No one takes more than they should, so everything is equally divided without actually having to divide it. Respect for fellow man is a driving force of this civilization. Crime does not exist, so law enforcement and courts do not exist either. Justice is already there without having to establish it. There is no government because it is not necessary, and there is no desire for it in the utopia. Nobody is ever treated unjustly or unfairly, and the thought of it is unfeasible due to the amount of reverence that is shared.

Not only do humans live in harmony, but humans and nature do as well. There is no unnecessary tampering or destruction of nature. Animals are no longer killed for food because it is realized that it was never essential. Nor are they slaughtered for clothing. Utopian citizens are good-natured. Anything worth caring for, they hold in very high regard.

Parents have no more than three children. This is the greatest number of children that parents can have while still paying essential attention to them. Parents in utopia are ideal, so nobody grows up with any unnecessary problems. People act within reason. Any sort of racist, sexist, ageist, homophobic, controlling or just plain hateful way of thinking or acting does not even exist.

In conclusion, concepts of the human mind and realities of the world must reside in harmony in order for a utopian society to succeed. Knowledge, reverence, and equality are the fundamental ingredients in a perfect social order. In the ideal society, these elements all come together to allow everyone to live in serenity. Nothing ever goes wrong, nor could anything ever. If anything went wrong in this society, it would no longer be perfect, and therefore it would no longer be a utopia. Utopia seems like it may be right in front of us, but unfortunately it is nowhere in sight.

My Utopia Essay

Utopia a state where everything is perfect, or a good place. Many people wonder whether it is truly possible to achieve a utopia like society. Countless people have wondered what a utopian society would be like. A lot come up with a place that asks the question a utopia for who? My utopia doesn’t try to fit the perfect image of utopia rather I like to make it a place where it isn’t a bad place for anyone, yet still strives to be a perfect place everyday improving without infringing on anyone else. Now that's not to say if you break the law you won’t be in trouble and you can do whatever you want because that would infringe on others in the society. This is a society based on fairness, justice, and basic liberties everyone should be afforded. It is not a society where everyone is completely legal and the same, but the choices are theirs everyone in this society is afforded the same opportunities. It's what you do with those opportunities that decide who you are.
More’s Utopia is described by Raphael he says, “well, the island is broadest in the middle, where it measures about two hundred miles across. It’s never much narrower than that, except towards the very ends, which gradually taper away and curve right around, just as if they’d been drawn with a pair of compassez, until they form a circle five hundred miles in circumference” (More 49). Raphael goes on to say, “Through this this the sea flows in, and then spreads out into an enormous lake- though it really looks more like a vast standing pool, for, as it’s completely protected from the wind by the surrounding land, the water never gets rough. Thus practically the whole interior of the island serves as a harbour, and boats can sail across it in all directions, which is very useful” (More 49). Utopia was once an a peninsula, but was conquered by Utopos, and made into an island. Much like Utopia, my utopia would be located on island, but my island would be roughly the same size as Australia. The island would be completely man made, to ensure that everyone living there chose to live there, and no one is being forced to give up their land. Also this would eliminate the need for war. In the Communist Manifesto it states, “Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communist revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win. Working men of all countries, unite” (Marx)! I would not like my utopia founded on war and oppression of other people. An island offers great seclusion from the rest of the world, and makes it much easier to control who can come into the country. The island would be like living on vacation. The temperature would stay in the 70s to 80s year round, except in the mountains, all located in the center of the island, where you would find snow. It would have two main intersecting rivers. One running north and south, and the other running east and west dividing the country into fours different sections. The center of each of these sections would...

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