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Special Place Essay Ideas For Of Mice

1. Discuss the book’s view of relationships between men.

2. Analyze Steinbeck’s portrayal of Curley’s wife as the lone female on the all-male ranch.

3. Paying attention to the long descriptive passages at the beginning of each section, discuss the ways in which the novella is similar to a theatrical play. Do these similarities strengthen or weaken the work? How?

4. Discuss George’s actions at the end of the story. How can we justify what he does to Lennie? How can we condemn it?

5. Discuss Steinbeck’s descriptions of the natural world. What role does nature play in the novella’s symbolism?

6. Analyze the characters of Slim, Crooks, and Curley. What role does each character play?

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Of Mice and Men (SparkNotes Literature Guide Series)

Loneliness and Lenny in John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men Essay

608 Words3 Pages

The Great Depression was a period in the 1930’s when America was in a state of economic collapse. Poverty and unemployment were common, thus, leading to large amounts of migrant workers. The novel by John Steinbeck, Of Mice and Men, is set in the times of the Great Depression. Steinbeck had abandoned the romantic view of mankind s occupying a special place in nature or that man is guided towards special ends. He did not see man as special or particularly cared for. Of Mice and Men reflects this philosophy. The characters experience loneliness, are unhappy with this state and desire empathy.
For various reasons the characters in the novel experience loneliness. These reasons include differences in gender, as is the case with Curly’s wife,…show more content…

The dream expresses their wish to be accepted by others.
The idea of the dream grows and gains credibility. Whenever a character talks about the dream, another character warms to the idea, and when two characters talk about the dream, a third character, who was previously sceptical, accepts it. This is seen whenever Lennie asks George about the dream, as George talks about it, both his and Lennie’s faith in the dream is strengthened. Also, when Crooks hears about the dream from Lennie, he is doubtful at first but slowly starts to believe, when someone as experienced as Candy joins the conversation and shows how strongly he believes in the dream, Crooks is convinced that the dream is possible. This shows that the dream is so powerful, that even characters who have been hardened by years of reality or have just suffered a setback, are convinced that the dream is a reality.
Due to a number of circumstances, the dream seems reachable. Lennie and George would have had to work for years to save up enough money to buy the farm, but when Candy tells them that he has a large sum of money already saved up, it seems that they can already buy the farm in only a few months. The fact that a letter written by Bill Tenner, a former worker on the ranch, was published in a magazine, shows the workers that happiness is possible. Once the characters think of their dream, none of them immediately imagines that the dream cannot take place.

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